Photos: Rohingyas in India

Photo: Farheen Fatima

Cramped up space, makeshift tents with blankets hovering around to cover up the holes, puddle of water with mosquitoes inbreeding, and garbage lying around social distancing and preventive measures are nothing but a myth for the community living in this camp of India’s South Delhi having Rohingya Muslims.

Being one of the world’s most persecuted communities the misery and despair know no end here.

August 25 2020 marks three years of genocide when in 2017, more than 7 million fled from their homes after facing the persecution at the hands of Buddhist extremists in the Northern Rakhine state of Myanmar.

With uncertainty looming around on every community the Rohingya Muslims find themselves most at the receiving end as they struggle through the pandemic and the growing islamophobia.

As the monsoon takes over most of the makeshift homes in the camp struggles with not only clean drinking water but basic hygiene.

Stripped of basic human rights the community lives through challenges every day with children being affected the most. When children’s throughout the country were taking online classes the children of these Rohingya refugees were struggling with basic amenities. With already very poor literacy rates the ones who were enrolled in nearby NGOs have to drop out and discontinue until things get better.

With around 50 families living in the camp majority of them were dependent on daily wage labor. Now with the coronavirus pandemic in place, most of the families are finding it difficult to survive through it.

Being a noncitizen puts them in the most vulnerable position. However, with the right-wing government in power, their plight has been deliberately overlooked marking them as potential threats and reducing them to the status of illegal migrants only.

The plight of the Rohingya Muslims has been overlooked by the human rights commission at most.

Their plight doesn’t need just attention but also extra support from the human rights commission and volunteers alike.

Photo: Farheen Fatima
Photo: Farheen Fatima
Photo: Farheen Fatima
Photo: Farheen Fatima
Photo: Farheen Fatima

Farheen Fatima is studying M A Mass Communication in Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi and she writes on politics and gender.